2008-09 Vital Source Mag – September 2008

  • Moon Over Buffalo

    By Jenna Raymond Very often, comedies can be overdone. Characters can seem generic and ridiculous as the entire plot grows to completely unrealistic proportions. However, under the direction of Debra Krajec, Marquette University’s production of Ken Ludwig’s Moon Over Buffalo is nuanced, seamless and zany in the best way. The action takes place behind the […]

  • Gypsy

    This iconic musical retells the story of a show business mother, Rose, and her two daughters, Louise and June. Louise went on to become the Burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee. Gypsy: A Musical Fable, provides a softer framing for what June described as a “much darker childhood” than the fable presented in the musical based […]

  • State of the Union

    The Milwaukee Rep responds to a long, exhausting presidential campaign with Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse’s State of the Union. Despite having been written half a century ago, State of the Union delivers a surprisingly topical look at presidential politics in an entertaining show that only feels a bit long at times. The Rep draws […]

  • The Constant Wife

    It’s the classic tale of a man who loves a woman, a woman who loves a man and the world that gets in their way. Somerset Maugham’s tale of potential infidelity comes to the Boulevard Theatre as it presents The Constant Wife. Maureen Dornemann stars as title character Constance Middleton whose fidelity to her husband […]

  • Gossamer

    Casey Tutton and Mark Metcalf in Gossamer Gos·sa·mer (n): a light and delicate touch. These words define this coming of age story that confronts sensitive social issues with light touches of humor, imagining the nature of dreams against the realities of domestic abuse through this credible ninety-minute production that deftly uses puppets to portray delicate […]

  • Splashcast

  • Doubt

    Taking on a Pulitzer Prize-winning play is a massive endeavor. With well-published expectations to aspire to, many companies and directors go over the top with set, lighting and costume descisions and play to stereotypes instead of bringing out true human beings with flawed judgment and emotional responses. But with John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt, the 2005 […]

  • La Boheme

    A large golden moon casts shadows over the Cabot Theatre’s stage set in Paris, 1933. In this glowing new version of La Boheme, Bill Theisen, the company’s artistic director, adapts the opera to define the artistic but risqué lifestyle rampant in Paris during that decade. With Theisen’s inspiration gleaned from the photographic collection of Brassai, […]

  • I Am My Own Wife

    Photo by Jay Westhauser A string of white pearls defines the central character, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, in The Rep’s season opener I Am My Own Wife at the Stiemke Theater. This real-life character, who was born in Berlin in 1928, wears a “black peasant dress, sturdy, in fact orthopedic, black shoes, and a string of […]

  • Ripper!

    In the autumn of 1888, a series of murders shook London’s Whitechapel district. The victims were all women, all murdered in similar ways, leading police to suspect they were all perpetrated by one person — now known to the world as Jack The Ripper. Possibly the most infamous serial killer of modern times, dozens of […]

  • Lombardi

    The Only Thing

    Making its way to Milwaukee after its debut in Madison last year, Eric Simonson’s Lombardi: The Only Thing arrives at the intimate Off-Broadway Theatre with an updated script and a stellar cast. Next Act Producing Artistic Director David Cecsarini stars as legendary Packers coach Vince Lombardi in a story that mixes fact with fiction and […]

  • Love’s Labour’s Lost

    By Jaymee Sherman Lights … camera … Shakespeare? Milwaukee Shakespeare’s opening night performance of the comedy Love’s Labour’s Lost was not just another go at the Bard in a modern day setting, for these renditions are recently legion. No, this was a headlong jump into the deep end that successfully brought a hilarious Elizabethan era […]