Threads

Meet your fashionistas

By - Feb 16th, 2010 09:09 am
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Two ladies. Two views. Two very keen senses of style. Look for Threads, our new fashion blog, likely to shake, shatter and occasionally enhance your own sense of style and self every other week. In this introductory blog, our two columnists Natalie Emmer and Emily Thungkaew introduce themselves and the ethos behind their fashion sense.

Natalie: It’s me, my fashionable self
Nowadays, the dress for success formula is as crucial as a first impression. Prior to creating what I think will become a lasting impression, I’ll often find myself standing in a neon-coral terrycloth bathrobe staring into the shallow abyss of my overflowing closet, wondering: what ever shall I wear? Chances are, I’ve been mulling over this thought for a while, nonetheless failing to reach an ultimate consensus. So, I’ll finger through the color-blocked array of blouses, knits and tees hanging before me, consider my footwear options and look to signature accessories for inspiration. I’ll put on a personal fashion show, tap into my “store” of style-savvy insight and, in a frenzied crunch for time, piece together something casually chic. In most cases, it was my go-to classic black, the occasional blazer or dark-washed denim skinnies and lots of layers. Scarves are key, as are blazers. Women, men, whomever — invest in an infinite number of both, and you’ll stay timelessly dressed for life.

AudreyHepburnLead2PIC

Hmm. Should I go for an Audrey or Marilyn vibe today?

When it comes to fashion, I’m slightly schizophrenic. In those moments where I find myself debating what to wear, what I’m really trying to decide is, “What persona do I want to portray? Am I feeling vintage boho or J. Crew prep? High-style couture or laid-back coastal? Marilyn or Audrey? Classic, trendy or some tastefully eclectic in-between?” Of course, a handful of factors go into drawing a conclusion: what’s the occasion, who’s going to be present, what’s the weather going to do? (Quick side note: I hate the frigid Wisconsin winter, and I’m patiently waiting to step into spring freshly pedicured and wearing these adorable Dolce Vita wedges.)

In the end, whether you embrace the fact or not, what you wear does matter. Your personal style tells the world who you are. Not only does your attire affect how others react and relate to you, but it also determines the way you act and relate to them. When I rock a sartorially appealing ensemble — something I’ve carefully assembled, and literally “styled” — I carry myself with a refined grace: a heightened sense of poise, stamina and, above all, confidence. I’d argue the same goes for you.

That said, I challenge you to exercise your personal style as the ultimate means of a first impression and individual expression. Develop a keen awareness of your fashion aesthetic, how you present it and how you react to it.

Welcome to my world. I’m Natalie, a fashion columnist for now — a fashionista forever.
_

Emily: My evolution
I get a kick out of people that don’t think what you wear matters.  It does. Don’t lie. You can’t take back a first impression, and nothing says, “Nice to meet you” like great style and some killer boots.

I’m not Sienna Miller, Sarah Jessica Parker or Kate Moss, but I can definitely make it work.

Sienna Miller goes shopping.  I am not this girl.

Sienna Miller goes shopping. I am not this girl.

My style is more of an evolution. Having gone to a Catholic high school wearing a daily uniform, I packed “collegiate clothing” for college that my parents purchased at the campus bookstore. It didn’t take long for me to realize that wearing sweatpants and hoodies to class everyday wasn’t cutting it.

Eventually, I graduated to solid knits, consigned my flared-legged pants for boot-cut and skinny ones, started layering and began to accessorize. Voila! My typical uniform now consists of a V-neck tee, a cardigan, skinny jeans, cozy (but fashionable) boots and some kind of statement piece.

I’ve always believed that the key to standing out is to accessorize.  Whether it’s a scarf, big hoop earrings, a blingin’ bangle or a knock-out (literally) ring, accessories always get the compliments.

Natalie and I have been waiting a long time to get this party started. I’m more than excited about beginning this fashion adventure with Milwaukee and beyond. Now, let’s get moving.

Agree with us? Disagree? Let them know. Share your comments below.

Look for Emily and Natalie, together or separately, to share their fashion finesse every other week in TCD’s Threads column.

Categories: Life & Leisure

0 thoughts on “Threads: Meet your fashionistas”

  1. Anonymous says:

    I agree that the first impression is important, and that I feel good about myself when I look good. I also struggle however to maintain a balance between this, and overpowering materialistic desires that threaten to destroy my finances, and make my extremely humble hubby say “who are you and what have you done with my awesome, frugal, smart, down to earth, “don’t care what the world thinks ‘cuz I’m doing good things with my life” woman?

    I am torn between these worlds. I love art, and I believe that adornment and the wrapping of the human figure are amazing and tangible art forms, but I have a hard time with the advice that we should invest in infinite amounts of blazers and scarfs, and vests and etc. I think a small qty of really really nice pieces should be carefully chosen and will last a long time and serve well,rather than piles and piles. Tho I have a pretty hearty collection at the moment I admit… Jane Sibbery has and interesting approach to this, have you heard the interview with her where she talks about her one outfit? it’s really interesting.

    Anyhow, how do others manage to look good, Keep the spending reasonable and stay focused on the important things, (being kind, frugal, not getting obsessed with stupidly expensive handbags, making the world a better place and etc.) all at the same time??

    Struggling to find balance and looking forward to your series,
    Becky

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