Wisconsin Elections Commission
Press Release

Voters Still Have Time to Get ID for Primary Day

MADISON, WI – The Wisconsin Elections Commission reminds voters that they still have time to get the acceptable photo ID they will need to vote in the Spring Primary on February 20. “Most people already have the photo ID they need to vote such as a Wisconsin driver license or ID card,” said Michael Haas, […]

By - Feb 9th, 2018 11:27 am

MADISON, WI – The Wisconsin Elections Commission reminds voters that they still have time to get the acceptable photo ID they will need to vote in the Spring Primary on February 20.

“Most people already have the photo ID they need to vote such as a Wisconsin driver license or ID card,” said Michael Haas, interim administrator of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. “If you don’t have one of those or another acceptable photo ID, you can get one for free after just one visit to a Wisconsin DMV office.”

“Just bring whatever identifying documents you have like a birth certificate and proof of your current address to obtain a photo ID. If you don’t have those documents you may still obtain a document that you can use for voting through the ID Petition Process at the DMV office,” said Haas, Wisconsin’s chief elections official.

Haas said that in addition to a Wisconsin driver license, ID card or other DMV-issued document, voters can also use military and veteran’s IDs, some student IDs, tribal IDs, or a certificate of naturalization.  The full list is available at www.bringit.wi.gov.

“Your photo ID does not need to have your current address, and your name on your ID does not have to exactly match the name on the poll list,” Haas said.

If you do not have a photo ID on Election Day, or if poll workers say your ID is not acceptable, you can still cast a provisional ballot that will be counted if you bring an acceptable ID to the polling place before the polls close at 8 p.m. or the clerk’s office by 4 p.m. the Friday after the election.

There is only one statewide race on the ballot on February 20 – a primary for Wisconsin Supreme Court.   However, there may also be some primaries for local offices to be elected on April 3. To find out which candidates will be on your ballot, go to MyVote.wi.gov.

The Wisconsin Elections Commission is responsible for administration and enforcement of election laws in Wisconsin.  The Commission is made up of six Commissioners – four appointed directly by the State Senate Majority Leader, Speaker of the Assembly and the Minority Leaders in the State Senate and Assembly.  The remaining two Commissioners are by the Governor with confirmation by the State Senate from lists of former municipal and county clerks submitted by the legislative leadership in each party.

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