Charles Allis Art Museum
Press Release

Enjoy a Sake Tasting Event To Mark The Closing of The Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka K?gyo (1869-1927)

The Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum, 2220 N. Terrace Avenue, Milwaukee is hosting a Sake Tasting event.

By - Oct 6th, 2014 02:46 pm

Milwaukee, WI – The Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum, 2220 N. Terrace Avenue, Milwaukee is hosting a Sake Tasting event, Sunday October 12, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., to mark the closing of Noh Theatre In The Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka K?gyo (1869-1927). Learn about Sake and its nuances by tasting five different sakes throughout the evening. Plentiful sushi hors d’oeuvres and complimentary beer and wine will also be offered in addition to origami and haikus throughout the evening. $45 / $40 museum members. RSVP with Ann at RSVP@cavtmuseums.org or by phone at 414/278-8295 x5. This event is sponsored in by Unami Moto Asian Cuisine and Sake Lounge located at 718 N. Milwaukee Street. The event will be held at the Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum at 2220 N. Terrace Avenue.

Noh Theatre In The Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka K?gyo (1869-1927) has been extended through Sunday, October 19, 2014. This event is the ideal time to view the exhibition while enjoying a taste of Japanese culture. The exhibition curated by Martha Chaiklin, PhD and Annemarie Sawkins, PhD, features over 50 unique woodblock prints of Noh and Ky?gen theatre scenes produced by Tsukioka K?gyo, from the private collection of Richard J. and Mae J. Smethurst. The collectors will present and opening night talk titled Tsukioka K?gyo And The Revival Of Noh In Modern Japan, from 6:30 to 7:30p.m. This exhibition has been realized with support from the Japan Foundation, New York

Noh Theatre In The Woodblock Prints of Tsukioka K?gyo (1869-1927) Description
Tsukioka K?gyo became an internationally celebrated artist of the Meiji Period in Japanese history. He was, and remains, the preeminent artist of Noh (and Ky?gen) theatre. Between the 1890s and his death in 1927, K?gyo produced five major sets of prints. The prints in the exhibition not only showcase his incredible artistic talent but also an important Japanese theatrical tradition. In addition to prints by K?gyo, this exhibition will feature an authentic Noh mask provided by Elaine Erickson of Elaine Erickson Gallery. The exhibition curated by Martha Chaiklin, PhD and Annemarie Sawkins, PhD, features over 50 unique woodblock prints of Noh and Ky?gen theatre scenes produced by Tsukioka K?gyo, from the private collection of Richard J. and Mae J. Smethurst. This exhibition has been realized with support from the Japan Foundation, New York.

About Tsukioka K?gyo
Tsukioka K?gyo was born on March 7, 1869, as Hany? Bennosuke, the second son of a family that ran an inn, in a renowned “downtown” district of Tokyo. In 1880, his mother Taiko returned with Bennosuke to Hongoku-ch?, her home district of the city and was adopted into her family, the Sakamaki. Bennosuke then apprenticed in pottery painting with his uncle, an exporter of Japanese ceramics, in Yokohama. In 1883, he studied briefly at the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, before moving at age fifteen to Fukushima Prefecture to teach painting on pottery. In 1887, while still a teenager, Bennosuke entered the atelier of Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, one of the most prominent Meiji period woodblock print artists. Yoshitoshi taught K?gyo the fundamentals of painting and gave him the name Toshihisa (toshi means junior in Japanese). In 1889, Bennosuke/Toshihisa went to study with Ogata Gekk?, another important late nineteenth-century Japanese painter and printmaker, with whom the young artist studied painting flowers and birds. Gekk? gave the young artist the name K?gyo. After Yoshitoshi’s death in 1892, his wife Taiko succeeded as head of her husband’s school. In 1911, according to her will, K?gyo adopted Yoshitoshi’s surname and became the leader of the school. Thus in his early forties, Hany? Bennosuke, later Sakamaki K?gyo, finally acquired the name with which he is best known in the art and N?h world: Tsukioka K?gyo. —Richard J. Smethurst, Ph.D.

About Noh Theatre
Noh, literally “skill” or “ability,” a classical Japanese theater, draws its material from many sources and its form from ritual and folk dances. It has influenced musicians, dramatists, and poets as diverse as Bertholt Brecht, Eugene O’Neill, Paul Claudel, William Butler Yeats, Benjamin Britten, and Ezra Pound, and has been recognized as a UNESCO World Theater form. Some plays take the form of poetic, quasi-religious musical drama, some even without dramatic conflict, but many others have dramatic conflict and structured plots. Most main actors and some of their followers wear masks. Performances include a chorus of six to ten actors, and a musical ensemble compromised of a flutist and two or three drummers. The chorus plays a narrative role and often chants the lines of the main character. The play is acted with very few props, on a raised and resonant stage. The actors enter from the “Mirror Room” along a bridge flanked by three pine trees. There is also a painted, pine tree backdrop to the main stage.
This exhibition has been realized with support from the Japan Foundation, New York.

This event is sponsored by Unami Moto Asian Cuisine and Sake Lounge located at 718 N. Milwaukee Street. http://umamimoto.com

Use of Macron Symbol
The use of the macron in Japanese is to denote tone. Instructions on how to type macrons on Mac and PC computers can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Macrons.

About the Villa Terrace
The Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum is an Italian Renaissance-style villa designed and built by architect David Adler in 1923. Originally the home of Lloyd Smith of the A.O. Smith Corporation and his family, the Museum features fine and decorative arts dating from the 15th through to the 18th centuries, wrought-iron masterpieces by Cyril Colnik, a formal garden and changing exhibitions. The Museum is located at 2220 N. Terrace Ave. Public hours: Wednesday – Sunday, 1-5 p.m.   General Admission:   $7/adult, $5/student, senior (62+) and veterans, Free for museum members, children 12 & under, and active military. More information available at (414) 271-3656 or visit us at www.villaterracemuseum.org.

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