Tainted Water

DNR Program Replaces Lead Laterals

$14.5 million goes for schools, day care centers in “disadvantaged communities.”

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Lead from corroded pipes in Flint, Michigan, is partially to blame for a public health crisis in the impoverished community. After the city switched its drinking water source in 2014 to the highly corrosive Flint River, there was a spike in lead poisoning among Flint's children. Studies show 4.9 percent of Flint children tested have lead poisoning compared to 8.6 percent of Milwaukee children tested. Photo by Siddhartha Roy of FlintWaterStudy.org.

Lead from corroded pipes in Flint, Michigan, is partially to blame for a public health crisis in the impoverished community. After the city switched its drinking water source in 2014 to the highly corrosive Flint River, there was a spike in lead poisoning among Flint’s children. Studies show 4.9 percent of Flint children tested have lead poisoning compared to 8.6 percent of Milwaukee children tested. Photo by Siddhartha Roy of FlintWaterStudy.org.

Earlier this year, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources launched a $14.5 million program to help “disadvantaged municipalities” replace lead service lines. Of the 38 recipients, 18 communities, including Milwaukee, planned to use at least some of the money to replace lead lines leading to schools and day care centers.

Below is a list of the communities and the estimated number of schools or day care centers with lead service lines slated for replacement under this program:

Antigo — 4 of 4
Ashland — 5 of 5
Clintonville — 2 of 10
Eagle River — 10 of 10
Town of Florence — 2 of 10
Manitowoc — 15 of 15
Marshfield — 10 of 20
Milwaukee — 400 of 400
Monroe — 5 of 5
Mosinee — 2 of 2
Park Falls — 5 of 5
Platteville — 2 of 2
Princeton — 4 of 4
Randolph — 5 of 5
St. Francis — 2 of 5
Sheboygan — 11 of 11
Stratford — 4 of 4
Waterloo — 3 of 3

The nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (www.WisconsinWatch.org) collaborates with Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television, other news media and the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. All works created, published, posted or disseminated by the Center do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of UW-Madison or any of its affiliates.

More about the Lead Service Lines

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