Claire Nowak
Theater

Jeeves Takes One Last Bow

The Chamber Theatre continues its popular Jeeves comedies, as the perfect butler and star Matt Daniels return again.

By - Apr 16th, 2015 04:31 pm
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Jeeves Takes A Bow

Jeeves Takes A Bow

The newest production from Milwaukee Chamber Theatre brings classic British comedy—and mischief—to the Big Apple. In Jeeves Takes A Bow, Matt Daniels returns as the beloved butler, who accompanies his employer Bertie Wooster (Chris Klopatek) to Manhattan. There, they get roped into show business by Bertie’s friend, Blinky (Chase Stoeger) and find themselves in a jumble of swapped identities, romantic mishaps with Ruby LeRoy (Anna Cline) and Vivienne Duckworth (Kay Allmand) and even a bit of gunplay.

The play, which premiered in 2012, is Margaret Raether’s third adaptation of the classic P.G. Wodehouse stories. Milwaukee Chamber Theatre previously produced Raether’s other Woodhouse-inspired works, Jeeves Intervenes in 2010 and Jeeves In Bloom in 2013, which were big hits. Daniels has played Jeeves in all three shows. Tami Workentin will also be reprising her directing role.

This is Raether’s final Jeeves installment, and it’s a bittersweet time for Daniels. Before first taking on the role in Jeeves Intervenes, he had never read anything by Wodehouse, but the charm and wit of the original texts immediately grabbed his attention.

Revisiting the same character for five years seems to have rubbed off on Daniels. People comment that his work has become more “precise” since taking on the role, almost as he is channeling the care with which Jeeves calmly handles the bumbling Bertie. And though this is his third Jeeves play, Daniels enjoys it as much as ever.

“Jeeves himself remains an enigma of sorts, which is just how he likes it,” Daniels says.

Though Jeeves is taking his final bow at the MCT, Daniels has a sneaking suspicion the character will inevitably return somewhere. “He’s an indelible character, and I think there’s always room for him somewhere (on stage).”

Opens 7:30 p.m. April 16 and runs through May 3 at Cabot Theatre in the Broadway Theatre Center. Tickets range from $28-43, available online or by calling 414-291-7800.

The Pillowman

Irish playwright Martin McDonagh began his career writing his own fairy tales, but he discovered they contained something more sinister than what the audience heard on the surface. He then penned The Pillowman, opening at Soulstice Theatre this weekend. A writer named Katurian has been arrested because his violent short stories inspired recent child killings. The culprit? His own brother. The play includes both narrations and reenactments of several of Katurian’s stories, which begin to reveal disturbing things about the two brothers. The play has been performed in New York, Paris, Iran, South Korea, Hong Kong, Argentina and Australia.

Opens 7:30 p.m. April 16 and runs through May 2 at Soulstice Theatre. Tickets cost $20, available online or by calling 414-481-2800. This production is recommended for high school-aged viewers and older.

RX

If you’re looking for a new take on romantic comedy, Boulevard Theatre has the perfect prescription—RX, a play by Kate Fodor, opening this Saturday. Meena Pierotti (Ericka Wade) hates her editing job at American Cattle & Swine, mainly because of her sexist supervisor (Tom Dillon). She initially seeks help from a trial drug meant to treat workplace depression but ends up falling for Dr. Phil Gray (Jason Will), the trial’s administrator working under his pill-crazy boss (Marilyn White). When their relationship poses a problem for the drugs and Phil’s job, he seeks drastic measures—and gets results the doctor definitely did not order. Mark Bucher directs.

Opens 8 p.m. April 18 and runs through May 3 at Plymouth Church, 2717 E. Hampshire St. Tickets range from $10-20, available online or by calling 414-744-5757.

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